Posted:
This post originally appeared on the Google Cloud Platform blog 

Today we are announcing a new category of client libraries that has been built specifically for Google Cloud Platform. The very first library, gcloud-node, is idiomatic and intuitive for Node.js developers. With today’s release, you can begin integrating Cloud Datastore and Cloud Storage into your Node.js applications, with more Cloud Platform APIs and programming languages planned. The easiest way to get started is by installing the gcloud package using npm:
$ npm install gcloud
With gcloud installed, your Node.js code is simpler to write, easier to read, and cleaner to integrate with your existing Node.js codebase. Take a look at the code required to retrieve entities from Datastore:
var gcloud = require('gcloud');

var dataset = new gcloud.datastore.Dataset({
projectId: 'my-project',
keyFilename: '/path/to/keyfile.json' // Details at 
//https://github.com/googlecloudplatform/gcloud-node#README
});

dataset.get(dataset.key('Product', 123), function(err, entity) {
console.log(err, entity);
});
gcloud is open-sourced on Github; check out the code, file issues and contribute a PR - contributors are welcome. Got questions? Post them on StackOverflow with the [gcloud-node] tag. Learn more about the Client Library for Node.js at http://googlecloudplatform.github.io/gcloud-node/ and try gcloud-node today.

Posted by JJ Geewax, Software Engineer

Node.js is a trademark of Joyent, Inc. and npm is a trademark of npm, Inc.

Posted:
by Chris Han, Product Manager Google Apps Marketplace

The Google Apps Marketplace brings together hundreds of third-party applications that integrate and enhance Google Apps for Work. Previously, only administrators were able to install these applications directly for people at work. Now, any Google Apps user can install these applications by logging into Google Apps, clicking the app launcher icon , clicking More, and then clicking More from Apps Marketplace. By default, any Google Apps user can install apps from the Google Apps Marketplace—excluding K-12 EDU domains that are defaulted off. For more information, please see our Help Center
If you have an app in the Google Apps Marketplace utilizing oAuth 2.0, you can follow the simple steps below to enable individual end users to install your app. If you’re not yet using oAuth 2.0, instructions to migrate are here.

1. Navigate to your Google Developer Console.

2. Select your Google Apps Marketplace project.
3. Click APIs under the APIs & auth section.
4. Click the gear icon next to Google Apps Marketplace SDK.
5. Check Allow Individual Install.

6. Click Save changes.

Posted:
Last week, Apple updated their app submission policy requiring that resource bundles not include binaries. In order for your apps to meet these new requirements, you must either replace your existing Google+ iOS SDK with the updated 1.7.1 Google+ iOS SDK that has the files removed or remove the following files from the GooglePlus bundle:

  • GooglePlus.bundle/GPPSignIn3PResources
  • GooglePlus.bundle/GPPCommonSharedResources.bundle/GPPCommonSharedResources
  • GooglePlus.bundle/GPPShareboxSharedResources.bundle/GPPShareboxSharedResources 

Please update your app immediately, or your app will be rejected by Apple. Because the files were only used for versioning, the change will have no impact on your app's functionality.

Posted by Mohamed Zoweil, Software Engineer, Google

Posted:
By Søren Gjesse, Software Engineer on Dart

Developers increasingly want to use the same language and business logic on the client and the server to reduce risk and complexity. To help developers easily build and deploy end-to-end Dart apps, we are happy to announce ready-to-use Docker images for Dart. This expands our Docker usage further beyond the recently announced Docker support in Google App Engine. There are now three Dart-related images on hub.docker.com for you to use: dart, dart-runtime and dart-hello, which uses the same naming scheme as the corresponding Node, Python and Go images already offered.

The image google/dart adds the Dart SDK to google/debian Debian wheezy image. Running Dart in a container is now as simple as this:

  $ docker run -i -t google/dart /usr/bin/dart --version

The image google/dart-runtime inherits from google/dart, and provides a convenient way to run a Dart server application using a one line Dockerfile. To inherit from google/dart-runtime, your server application requires the following layout:

  • has a the pubspec.yaml and pubspec.lock files listing its dependencies.
  • has a file bin/server.dart as the entrypoint script.
  • listens on port 8080

With this layout and a Dockerfile with the following content:

FROM google/dart-runtime

You can run your app in a container as simple as this:

  $ docker build -t my-app .
  $ docker run -d -p 8080:8080 my-app

The last image google/dart-hello is a sample Dart server application, that inherits from dart/runtime. Here is an example of how to run the sample:

  $ docker run -d -p 8080:8080 google/dart-hello

Depending on your local Docker installation the address of the server differs. If you are using boot2docker with the default configuration you can talk to the Dart server in the docker container on http://192.168.59.103:8080:

  $ curl http://192.168.59.103:8080/version

You can choose specific version tags, such as 1.6.0 (recommended), or choose the ‘latest’ tag for the latest stable version. Here is an example of running Dart 1.6 with Docker:

  $ docker run -i -t google/dart:1.6.0 /usr/bin/dart --version

If you haven't already, go and install boot2docker and start building you Dart server application using Docker images. Pushing these images to you server will simplify deployment and ensure you are running the same code on your server as you have been testing locally.

Posted by Mano Marks, Google Developer Platform Team

Posted:
This post originally appeared on the Google Cloud Platform blog 
by Julie Pearl, Director, Developer Relations

Today at the Google for Entrepreneurs Global Partner Summit, Urs Hölzle, Senior Vice President, Technical Infrastructure & Google Fellow announced Google Cloud Platform for Startups. This new program will help eligible early-stage startups take advantage of the cloud and get resources to quickly launch and scale their idea by receiving $100,000 in Cloud Platform credit, 24/7 support, and access to our technical solutions team.

This offer is available to startups around the world through top incubators, accelerators and investors. We are currently working with over 50 global partners to provide this offer to startups who have less than $5 million dollars in funding and have less than $500,000 in annual revenue. In addition, we will continue to add more partners over time.

This offer supports our core Google Cloud Platform philosophy: we want developers to focus on code; not worry about managing infrastructure. Starting today, startups can take advantage of this offer and begin using the same infrastructure platform we use at Google.

Thousands of startups have built successful applications on Google Cloud Platform and those applications have grown to serve tens of millions of users. It has been amazing to watch Snapchat send over 700 million photos and videos a day and Khan Academy teach millions of students. Another example, Headspace, is helping millions of people keep their minds healthier and happier using Cloud Platform for Startups. We look forward to helping the next generation of startups launch great products.

For more information on Google Cloud Platform for Startups, visit http://cloud.google.com/startups.

Posted by Katie Miller, Google Developer Platform Team

Posted:
This post originally appeared on Webmaster Central
by Jeff Kaufman, Make the Web Fast


Webmaster level: advanced
Everyone wants to use less bandwidth: hosts want lower bills, mobile users want to stay under their limits, and no one wants to wait for unnecessary bytes. The web is full of opportunities to save bandwidth: pages served without gzip, stylesheets and JavaScript served unminified, and unoptimized images, just to name a few.
So why isn't the web already optimized for bandwidth? If these savings are good for everyone then why haven't they been fixed yet? Mostly it's just been too much hassle. Web designers are encouraged to "save for web" when exporting their artwork, but they don't always remember.  JavaScript programmers don't like working with minified code because it makes debugging harder. You can set up a custom pipeline that makes sure each of these optimizations is applied to your site every time as part of your development or deployment process, but that's a lot of work.

An easy solution for web users is to use an optimizing proxy, like Chrome's. When users opt into this service their HTTP traffic goes via Google's proxy, which optimizes their page loads and cuts bandwidth usage by 50%.  While this is great for these users, it's limited to people using Chrome who turn the feature on and it can't optimize HTTPS traffic.

With Optimize for Bandwidth, the PageSpeed team is bringing this same technology to webmasters so that everyone can benefit: users of other browsers, secure sites, desktop users, and site owners who want to bring down their outbound traffic bills. Just install the PageSpeed module on your Apache or Nginx server [1], turn on Optimize for Bandwidth in your configuration, and PageSpeed will do the rest.

If you later decide you're interested in PageSpeed's more advanced optimizations, from cache extension and inlining to the more aggressive image lazyloading and defer JavaScript, it's just a matter of enabling them in your PageSpeed configuration.


[1] If you're using a different web server, consider running PageSpeed on an Apache or Nginx proxy.  And it's all open source, with porting efforts underway for IIS, ATS, and others.

Posted by Mano Marks, Google Developer Platform Team

Posted:

By Austin Robison, Product Manager, Android Wear




Fitness apps make  great additions to Android Wear. Let’s take a look at one of our favorites, Runtastic. Runtastic is a fitness app that lets you track your walks, runs, bike rides and more. With Runtastic on Android Wear, you'll see your time, distance, and calories burned at a glance on your wrist. You can also start, stop and pause your activity by touch. Tuck your phone away in a pocket or backpack and do everything on your watch.


It's challenging to build user experiences that really come alive on Android Wear because it's such a new type of device. Runtastic does a great job of showing the right information and providing just the right controls on the screen on your wrist. Let's dig into some of the Android Wear platform features that Runtastic uses to make such a great user experience.

Voice Actions

Android Wear enables developers to launch their activities with voice. Runtastic responds to “Ok Google, start running” by beginning to track a session and displaying a card with your total time. This means you can start exercising without needing to pull your phone out of a pocket or arm strap. Android Wear is all about bringing you useful information just when you need it and enabling users to quickly and easily take action.


runtastic_01.png


Responding to platform voice intents on Wear is as simple as declaring a standard intent filter to start an activity.  For example, to launch your activity for the “start running” voice action, add the following to your activity’s entry in your AndroidManifest.xml:


<intent-filter>
   <action android:name="vnd.google.fitness.TRACK"/>
   <category android:name="android.intent.category.DEFAULT"/>
   <data android:mimeType="vnd.google.fitness.activity/running"/>
</intent-filter>


Custom Cards

Once a user has started a run, Runtastic inserts a card in the stream as an ongoing notification to ensure it is ranked near the top of the stream during the activity. This card uses the setDisplayIntent() function to display custom UI. It provides quick, glanceable information, showing your activity time. Cool!


When the user swipes to the right of the card to expose its actions, we see some quick and easy to understand options; following the Android Wear style guidelines means that Runtastic has a familiar UI and feels like a natural extension of the watch. There are actions for pausing, stopping, and an action to see more details on the run.  This action launches a full screen Activity where Runtastic draws a completely custom layout.




You’ll notice this data updates live; Runtastic makes use of the Wearable Data Layer API in Google Play Services to synchronize data between the phone and the watch. It's an easy to use API for syncing data between your devices.


Background Services

When a user finishes their run, Runtastic presents them with a special summary card that appears only on the watch. In this case, the notification is generated directly on the watch by a Service. This Service uses the Data Layer to receive information about the completed activity from the phone to the watch, including an image of a map of the user’s run generated through the Google Maps API.


To show that information, the app uses Android Wear’s NotificationManager, which functions just like the NotificationManager on a phone or tablet, except that instead of creating notifications in the pull-down shade, they appear in the stream.




Runtastic's implementation on Android Wear is a perfect example of how to take advantage of wearables to make something truly useful for users. For more information on these and other great platform features, please see the developer documentation.


For more inspiring Android Wear user experiences, check out this collection on the Play Store!


Posted by Mano Marks, Google Developer Platform Team

Posted:
Posted by Dan Ciruli, Product Manager


On November 1, 2010, we announced the deprecation of the Web Search API. As per our policy at the time, we supported the API for a three year period (and beyond), but as all things come to an end, so has its deprecation window.


We are now announcing the turndown of the Web Search API. You may wish to look at our Custom Search API (note: it has a free quota of 100 queries per day).

The service will cease operations on September 29th, 2014.

Posted:


Google Drive for Work is a new premium offering for businesses that includes unlimited storage, advanced audit reporting and new security controls and features, such as encryption at rest.

If you're getting ready to move your company to Drive, one of the first things on your mind is how to migrate all your existing files with as little hassle as possible. It's easy to migrate your files by uploading them directly to Drive or using the Drive Sync client. But, what if you have files stored elsewhere that you want to consolidate? Or what if you want to migrate multiple users at once? Many independent software vendors (ISVs) have built solutions to help organizations migrate their files from different File Sync and Share (FSS) solutions, local hard drives and other data sources. Here are some of the options available for you to use:
  • Cloud Migrator, by Cloud Technology Solutions, migrates user accounts and files to Google Drive and other Google Apps services. (websiteblogpost)
  • Cloudsfer, by Tzunami, transfers files from Box, Dropbox and Microsoft OneDrive to Google Drive. (website)
  • Migrator for Google Apps, by Backupify, migrates and consolidates personal Google Drive or other Google Apps for Business accounts into a single domain. (websiteblogpost)
  • Mover migrates data from 23 cloud services providers, web services, and databases into Google Drive. (websiteblogpost)
  • Nava Certus, by LinkGard, provides a migration and synchronization solution for on-premise and cloud-based storage platforms, including Dropbox, Microsoft OneDrive, Amazon S3, as well as local file systems. (website,blogpost)
  • SkySync, by Portal Architects, integrates existing on-site storage systems as well as other cloud storage providers to Google Drive. (websiteblogpost)
These are just a few companies that offer migration solutions. Please visit the Google Apps Marketplace for a complete listing of tools and offerings that add value to the Google Apps platform.

Posted:
By Peter Lubbers, a Program Manager in charge of Google’s Scalable Developer Programs, which include MOOC developer training. Peter is the author of "Pro HTML5 Programming" (Apress) and, yes, his car's license plate is HTML5!

At Google I/O, we launched four new Udacity MOOCs, helping developers learn how to work with Android, Web, UX Design, and Cloud technology. We’re humbled that almost 100,000 students signed up for these new courses since then. Over the next two weeks, we’ll be hosting on-air office hours to help out students who are working through some of these classes. Ask your questions via the Moderator links below, and the Google Experts will answer them live. Please join us if you are taking the class, or just interested in the answers.
Screen Shot 2014-08-18 at 8.06.30 AM.png

Class: Web Performance Optimization — Critical Rendering Path
Class: Android Fundamentals
Class: Building Scalable Apps with Google App Engine
You can find all of the Google Udacity MOOCs at www.udacity.com/google.


Posted by Mano Marks, Scalable Developer Advocacy Team